Peer Pressure Pointers

Peer Pressure Pointers

 

ThouImage of girl pushing boy on skateboardgh it’s a force to be reckoned with throughout our lives, peer pressure is arguably the most in-your-face during the school years. Don’t let your kids fall prey to its powers! 

This month’s goal: Teach your kids that peer pressure can make us do absurd things and spend ridiculous amounts of money, but that it can be overcome with confidence and self-discipline. 

Pointers to cover: 

  • The definition of peer pressure.
  • How peer pressure influences our choices.
  • When peer pressure can be a positive thing.
  • How going against the flow shows true inner strength.
  • The fleeting nature of most fads.

Conversation starters 

For kids under age 9:

  • Can you think of something you own just because one of your friends has one, too?
  • When is it a good idea to follow the crowd?
  • Everyone wants to fit in. How can you be part of the group without copying everything they do, buy or say? 

For kids over age 9:

  • Can you think of some ways peer pressure exists for adults?
  • Do you think more or less of someone who is always copying what everyone else is doing?
  • Has anyone ever followed what you did, bought or wore? How did that make you feel?
  • Who do you think is more confident, someone who copies what others do or someone who thinks for themselves?
  • Can you think of some circumstances when peer pressure can be a positive thing?
  • How do you think our lives would be different if we didn’t care what other people thought  of our choices?

Accepting A “No”

Accepting A “No”

Image of Father explaining to his daughter

It isn’t easy for a child to hear a “no” when they want something, but it can be even harder for parents to say. 

This month’s goal: Teach your children that there is a positive value in not having everything we want, even when we can afford it. 

Pointers to cover: 

  • The fallacy of “having it all.”
  • Staying off the hedonic treadmill.
  • Learning how to accept a “no” answer.
  • Learning how to tell yourself “no.”
  • Why even the richest people cannot, and should not, grant their children’s every wish.

Conversation starters 

For kids under age 9:

  •  Why do you think Mom and Dad sometimes tell you “no” when you ask for something?
  • What can be wrong with having everything you want?
  • Can you think of some things that Mom and Dad want (and can afford) but don’t buy?

For kids over age 9:

  • Do you think people who own more things are happier than those who have only what they need and just some of their wants?
  • Why is it hard to be denied what we want?
  • What can be wrong with granting a child’s every wish if the child’s parents can afford it?
  • Do you know anyone who can’t take a “no?”
  • If you were a parent, how would you handle a child who constantly asks for new toys and gadgets?

Needs VS. Wants

Needs VS. Wants

image of daughter speaking with her dad

When the lines between needs and wants are blurred, curbing our spending becomes an

impossible task. Teach your children this crucial tool and empower them for life. 

This month’s goal: Showing children how to identify needs and wants. 

Pointers to cover:

  • How to tell the difference between a need and a want.
  • How to prioritize between needs and wants.
  • When a want can turn into a need.
  • How to pay for wants that aren’t built into a monthly budget.

Conversation starters 

For kids under age 9:

  • What are some things you need in order to survive?
  • Can you list some things you wish you could have?
  • Is it more important to pay for the things we need or for the things we want?
  • How can we pay for some wants?

For kids over age 9:

  • Can you list all of your wants and needs?
  • When can a want become a need? Does it ever happen the other way?
  • Why is it important to allow ourselves to have some of our wants?
  • Do our needs change throughout our lives?
  • Do wants ever fade away?
  • Can you think of a plan that can help you buy something on your “want” list?

Saving Smarts

Saving Smarts

 

Image of Dad and Daughter talking at table about saving.For the responsible adult who thinks about being prepared for the future, savings are a fixed expense that is built into the monthly budget just like car payments and insurance. For most people, though, this habit does not come naturally. It needs to be acquired and practiced.

Teach your kids those saving smarts now when they’re young to help make it a lifetime habit they’ve already mastered by the time they hit their 20s. 

This month’s goal: Give your kids a clear understanding of why saving is crucial to financial wellness and how to make it happen. 

Pointers to cover: 

  • Why putting money aside each month is crucial
  • How interest and compound interest work
  • Long-term vs. short-term saving
  • Reasons to save

Conversation starters 

For kids under age 9: 

  • Let’s say you’ve only got $15 and you want to buy a drone that costs $65. You get $5 a week as your allowance. How can you buy that drone?
  • When did you wait for something and find that it was more enjoyable because you waited for it?
  • Can you think of some things that Mom or Dad saves up for?
  • If you earn $0.10 for every dollar you save, how much money will you earn by putting  away $5?

For kids over age 9: 

  • Are you saving up for anything important?
  • Can you think of some things that Mom or Dad saves up for?
  • Have you ever had to pay for something unexpected? How did you come up with the money?
  • Some things we save for are short-term goals, and others are long-term goals. Can you name some of each kind of goal? How will we save differently for each kind?
  • Do you think it’s smart for Mom and Dad to keep money they’re saving under the mattress? Why or why not?